Beef Roulades with Potato and Turnip Dumplings

The second challenge for Freshly Blogged is out.  I love seeing the creativity from everyone, such different ideas; I am definitely going to be trying some of my fellow bloggers recipes.

This challenge was sponsored by Knorr – a brand that is a staple in my pantry.

I love comfort food – a slow-cooked meal which sends beautiful aromas through the house, enticing your senses and making you salivate in anticipation. Different cultures consider different dishes to be comfort food. To me these ingredients lend themselves to just that typical meal. Best of all, it’s the kind of dish you can eat family-style with people you love. To me, this is what food is all about… Comfort and family.

Beef Roulades with Potato and Turnip Dumplings

Beef Roulades with Potato and Turnip Dumplings

125ml PnP White Wine Vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
1 punnet PnP Soup Pack (carrot, leek, tomato, celery, potato, turnip)
Zest of 1 lemon
5 Salticrax, crushed to breadcrumb consistency
500g beef shin
Olive oil for frying
4 tbsp freshly chopped oregano
1 Knorr Beef Stock Pot
1 whole PnP star anise
1 cup self-raising flour
1 egg
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 200C.

Mix white wine vinegar and sugar in a bowl, julienne half the carrot and half the leek. Add to bowl. Set aside to marinate.

Roughly dice the remainder of the carrot and leek, as well as tomato and celery. Set aside.

Mix lemon zest and Salticrax together and set aside.

Dice potatoes and turnips. Set aside.

Cut meat off the bone. Roast bones in oven for 25-30 minutes. Remove and set aside. Reduce oven heat to 150 degrees.

Using a very sharp knife, cut beef shin into 6 large chunks. Slice each chunk 3 quarters - way through the middle to make a thin fillet. Place between sheets of plastic wrap and pound gently, creating a wafer-thin slice of meat. Repeat with each chunk. Set aside.

Place sliced meat on a flat surface and season. Put a little of the lemon zest and cracker mix in the middle. Do the same with the pickled carrots and leeks. Roll tightly and secure with one or two toothpicks. Repeat until you have stuffed all the beef slices.

Note: Julienne is a culinary knife cut in which the food item is cut into long thin strips, similar to matchsticks. Sometimes called “shoe string”.

Cooking method

Use an oven-friendly dish that can be used on the hob. Heat over medium to high heat.
Brown beef roulades in a little olive oil. Set aside.
In the same pot, fry roughly diced vegetables until soft, add oregano and 3 tbsp of pickling liquid.
Add beef stock pot and 1l of boiling water. Add roasted bones and star anise and simmer. Season. Add beef rolls gently, cover pot and place in oven for 2 hours.
To make the dumplings, cook potatoes and turnips in a pot of salted boiling water until soft enough to mash. Drain water and mash until smooth. Add flour and mix through. Add egg and mix until all is well incorporated. Season to your liking. Set aside.
After 2 hours, place a heaped tbsp of dumpling mixture into pot with meat. Repeat until you have used up all the mixture. Place back into the oven at 180 degrees and cook for 1 hour. Turn off oven.
Remove pot from oven. Take out dumplings and meat and keep in the warm oven. Blitz sauce and place on medium heat to reduce slightly until thick.

Plate up and enjoy. Perfect wintery night comfort.

Note: The sauce is so versatile, you can use it as stock for your next dish or make it into a soup.

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Oxtail, the perfect winter comfort food

My Comfort Food…I love stew type dishes, I love slow roasted, long cooking stews that takes hours and hours, with full flavoured sauces, but yet have very little work to them…that warmth and hearty feeling of a good winter meal.

I have often wondered what the fascination with oxtail is, in my opinion it wouldn’t be the best cut on the market, however, it is a delicious cut none the less.  As a child, I remember we use to eat a fair amount of oxtail, my older brother and I always referred to it as the “airplane bones” my dad would make, we would spend so much time licking the bones and giggling over the shapes.

With the really cold windy weather we are currently experiencing here in the country, I wanted something that would give me that hearty feeling I crave, my mind went all over, but settled on oxtail, I had the time, so after going to hunt for oxtail, I got into the kitchen and began the dish that brought back such fond childhood memories.

Wintery Oxtail

1.5kg oxtail
about 300g flour
2 tbsp Robertsons bbq spice
1 tbsp mixed dried herbs
oil for frying
1 tin whole peeled tomatoes
5 carrots, in large cubes
1 pk tomato paste
2 onions, cut roughly
2 cups red wine
2 cups beef stock
1 can butter beans
1 ½ star anise
seasoning

Mix the flour, bbq seasoning and dried herbs in a container.  Coat the oxtail in the flour mixture and brown in a pan.
Remove from pan and place into a deep oven proof casserole dish.
Add the onions, carrots, tomato paste, tomatoes, beef stock and red wine to the casserole dish, you want to ensued the meat is well covered.
Season, toss in the star anise and cover.
You want to cook the oxtail at 160°C for 6 – 7 hours, and then turn your oven up to 220° C for an hour, the higher heat will thicken your sauce a little more.
Remove from heat, drain the butter beans and add to the oxtail.
Let heat through and serve with light fluffy mashed potatoes.

And that, for me, is my perfect comfort food, with no mess and no fuss!

Sunday Afternoon Poitjiekos and Cannellini Bean & Beetroot Salad

Poitjie is such a South Africa tradition, and personally one of my favourit meals to prepare. I love doing a great poitjie, and have been lacking in doing so since we moved into the flat.

A little history on the poitjie…The round potbellied cast iron pot was the perfect cooking utensil to suit the nomadic lifestyle of the black tribes and the Voortrekkers during the 17th and 18th centuries. Potjiekos evolved as a stew, made of venison and vegetables (if the latter were available). The pot with its contents protected by a layer of fat was hooked under the wagon by the Voortrekkers while travelling and unhooked at the next stop to be put on the fire again.

When the wagons stopped at the end of the day and camp was made, game was stewed and sometimes mutton, goat or old oxen when available. As each new animal was shot, it was slaughtered and the meat added to the pot, together with whatever vegetables that could be found. The large bones were added replacing the old ones, to thicken the stew. Surplus meat was preserved by seasoning and drying.

So on my day off, I thought I would do a little poitjie. The first step to a good poitjie is to burn the pot. Wash it thoroughly, then place it back on the fire to get it really hot before cooking again.

The best part about a poitjie is that you can add whatever meat and vegetables you wish to add, and your cooking liquid is all up to you. I used beef with red wine. Another great combo I love is chicken and beer poitjie.

Now what does one serve with a poitjie? Well, traditionally it would be “pap” or dumplings and in many homes it is rice. I also served one of my cannellini bean salads, which was actually very nice. The cannellini bean’s meatiness worked really well with the poitjie, and you could even add it directly to the poitjie, however, I rather did a salad.

Cannellini & Beetroot salad

2 cups cannellini beans, leftover night to soak, and boiled until soft
fresh beetroot, boiled until soft
Danish feta
fresh rosemary
balsamic reduction

Add all together, ensure your beetroot is cooled properly before you add to the salad.